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The 2018 Smoke Signals Indigenous Cannabis Cup just took place on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory

This is one of the first indigenous-focused cannabis events to kick off in the country ahead of the impeding legalization that is set to commence this summer

Bethan Rose Jenkins, Cannabis News Writer/Editorial

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On May 18, the 2018 Smoke Signals Indigenous Cannabis Cup kicked off on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory.  The event stretched over four days, enticing hordes of indigenous people who were keen to celebrate cannabis culture in Canada.

This is one of the first indigenous-focused cannabis events to kick off in the country ahead of the impending legalization that is set to commence this summer.

First Nations embraced cannabis legalization and proudly demonstrated their relationship with the green plant at the cup, which lured in visitors from Prince Edward Island to Vancouver.

Who are the organizers of the Indigenous Cannabis Cup?

https://smokesignalstmt.com/category/jamie-kunkel/

Jamie Kunkel founded the 2018 Smoke Signals Indigenous Cannabis Cup

As the first ever annual Indigenous Cannabis Cup, the event was certainly one to remember.

Owner of Smoke Signals Tyendinaga, Jamie Kunkel, is the man behind the shindig, which celebrates cannabis culture in Canada.

“This will likely be the largest gathering of indigenous people connected to the cannabis plant in history,” Kunkel said ahead of the event launch.

Kunkel chose the location wisely, what with the cannabis movement experiencing major growth in Tyendinaga over the last few years.

His motive to organize the Indigenous Cannabis Cup was to promote awareness about cannabis’ role in enhancing the health of indigenous peoples.

Bob Marley’s granddaughter was present at the Indigenous Cannabis Cup

https://nowtoronto.com/news/cannabis-indigenous-communities-legalization/

Bob Marley’s granddaughter, Donisha Prendergast, took to the stage at the Indigenous Cannabis Cup

A whole host of activities took place at this celebration of cannabis culture in Canada.

While the sound of music filled the air, attendees could be seen huddled around bonfires, setting up their tents for a long weekend of camping and participating in workshops.

Most people’s attention seemed to be focused on the construction and smoking of the world’s largest peace pipe, until Bob Marley’s granddaughter, Donisha Prendergast, took to the stage.

One of many presenters who participated in the happenings, Prendergast expressed her love for the herb and desires for it to be legalized as she gazed out onto a fixated crowd.

Canada’s indigenous cannabis community could profit from legalization

Canada is preparing to legalize recreational cannabis on July 1, 2018.When this happens, it will become the largest industrial nation in the world to legalize the medicinal plant for adult use.

Canada’s multi-billion dollar industry stands to benefit First Nations people, many of whom are hoping to get jobs in the cannabis industry or even launch their own cannabis companies.

“It means economic opportunities for First Nations people and so, many First Nations across this country are in such dire straits,” said the Chief of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Allan Adam.

The federal government will issue cannabis cultivation licenses to growers. Retail vendors and distributors will be monitored by provinces throughout the nation.

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The 2018 Smoke Signals Indigenous Cannabis Cup just took place on Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory