Minimum age for cannabis consumption in Six Nations set at 21

Health Canada says it “acknowledges the interests of Indigenous communities and governments in establishing models and rules that meet their unique needs."

Bethan Rose Jenkins, Cannabis News Writer/Editorial

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A minimum age for cannabis consumption in Six Nations has been confirmed by the Nations’ elected-band council.

Individuals aged 21 and above will have the opportunity to cultivate, sell and distribute weed, so long as the activity occurs within the boundaries of his/her specific territory. The recently confirmed age for cannabis consumption in Six Nations is older than the age set forth under Ontario’s cannabis laws, which is 19.

“The age of 21 was suggested to protect the young people,” proposed Chief Ava Hill, in regards to the Six Nations draft cannabis law.

Previously, tribes and indigenous communities claimed to have been neglected in relation to Canada’s legalization discussions. One month before cannabis became fully legal across the Great White North on October 17th of this year, the most populous First Nations reserve in Canada revealed it would be drafting its own cannabis laws.

Medical patients won’t be affected by age requirement for cannabis consumption in Six Nations

Individuals who are younger than the required age for cannabis consumption in Six Nations, but who necessitate cannabis for medical purposes, will be exempt from the rule.

Based on the details of the 22-page document, doctors will be legally allowed to write a prescription for the green plant, so long as the individual’s medical circumstances are a good match for weed-based treatments.

Six Nations draft cannabis law will be overseen by governmental officials

https://www.facebook.com/Six-Nations-Police-194912403886073/During an interview with The Spectator, Health Canada revealed how it would acknowledge “the interests of Indigenous communities and governments in establishing models and rules that meet their unique needs.”

The draft law forbids indigenous peoples from using cannabis in any public space. Anyone who is punished for a first offense could be slapped with a $1,000 fine. Any offense that is committed thereafter could cost the individual $5,000. 

Criminal breaches of the law relating to cannabis use, possession and sales will be enforced by the Six Nations Police Service. Based on the details of the Six Nations draft cannabis law, regulations must be managed locally “at the exclusion” of the federal and provincial governments.

Disobeying corporations in Six Nations could face fines of $1 million

https://www.marijuana.com/news/2017/12/whoa-cannabis-business-owner-actually-gets-his-seized-assets-back/A cannabis control commission comprising five members will be assembled by the council to oversee everything. Depending on the circumstances, the commission will have the power to suspend, extend or revoke permits.

Administrative breaches are expected to be dealt with by the commission. Individuals risk being slammed with fines of up to $250,000, while corporations could be fined as much as $1 million.

Fees aside, permit holders must allocate eight percent of their gross cannabis sales to the elected council at the close of each month. The funds will be used to strengthen community initiatives and a legal defense fund. The council vows to “contribute to the defense of any permit holder” who obeys local laws but is penalized by provincial or federal authorities.