New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Advisory Board votes 4-0 for using weed to treat opioid-use disorder

Approximately 70,000 patients are currently enrolled in New Mexico’s medical cannabis program

Back to Article
Back to Article

New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Advisory Board votes 4-0 for using weed to treat opioid-use disorder

Bethan Rose Jenkins, Cannabis News Writer/Editorial

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Lawmakers in the “Land of Enchantment” have reaffirmed their support for adding opioid-use disorder to the state’s list of qualifying conditions for medical cannabis. 

The state’s support was reaffirmed on Friday, March 29, when New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Advisory Board voted 4-0 for using pharmaceutical-grade weed to treat opioid addiction.

Currently, the list of conditions that make someone a suitable candidate for medical cannabis in New Mexico includes chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cancer.

New Mexico governor is supportive of using cannabis to treat opioid addiction

https://www.google.com/search?q=Gov.+Michelle+Lujan+Grisham&safe=strict&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjBq4aSur7hAhWaVRUIHRclBkIQ_AUIDygC&biw=1280&bih=689#imgrc=tlbZHKYUGy_TcM:

(Pictured) New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham

Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s administration has been working hard to ensure medical cannabis is made available to people who are battling opioid addiction.

Last year, Grisham campaigned for office as a supporter of adding opioid dependency onto New Mexico’s list of qualifying conditions for medical cannabis.

Whether or not opioid abuse is added to the state’s list of qualifying conditions is at the discretion of Kathyleen Kunkel; the state’s newly appointed Health Secretary.

Her predecessor under Republican Gov. Susana Martinez disclosed how – due to a lack of research – the state was not entirely sure whether or not the plant could safely and effectively treat opiate dependence.

 

Health Department considers expanding list of qualifying conditions for cannabis

https://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/local_news/new-mexico-s-medical-cannabis-backlog-worsens/article_887084b7-da95-5da7-ae13-e02c992bc4b9.htmlApproximately 70,000 patients are currently enrolled in New Mexico’s medical cannabis program, which was established in 2007. Since this time, the list of qualifying conditions for cannabis has grown.

Chairwoman for the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board, Laura Brown, recently voiced her opinion on the measure. She claims that cannabis can reduce a person’s reliance on opioids, which are said to have killed 305 people in the southwestern U.S. state back in 2017.

“This is harm reduction, people need to be reminded,” said Brown, adding that she had recently met with Kunkel after receiving a secretary’s invitation.

According to Brown, a deadline has not yet been set for the Health Department to confirm whether or not opioid use is added to the list of qualifying conditions for cannabis access. Spokesman for the Health Department, David Morgan, claims that the agency’s secretary is also contemplating adding autism and degenerative neurological disorders, like Alzheimer’s disease, to the list of conditions.

On March 29, the advisory board also suggested expanding New Mexico’s medical cannabis program to individuals suffering from problems caused by using hallucinogens, stimulants, various prescription drugs and alcohol. A petition to grant people aged 65 and up with access to medical cannabis was instantly dismissed.