First ever Las Vegas cannabis marketplace is already in business

There's even a 24-hour drive-thru window to purchase adult-use cannabis products!

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First ever Las Vegas cannabis marketplace is already in business

Bethan Rose Jenkins, Cannabis News Writer/Editorial

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Nevada legalized recreational cannabis back in 2016. Since this time, there’s been some confusion in terms of where consumers can legally enjoy their bud. Previously, tourists visiting Nevada had limited choice as to where they could legally consume cannabis; unless they were friends with a local resident or had residency themselves.

Earlier this year, the City of Las Vegas announced that its efforts to approve public cannabis consumption in Nevada had been put on the back-burner until July 2021, at the very soonest. Although the state legislature will continue to push forward with public consumption efforts, consumers should be happy to know that they are no longer limited to using weed in the privacy of someone’s home.

Everything changed when the NuWu Cannabis Marketplace opened its doors on October 5, 2019. This local cannabis hangout spot can be found north of the Fremont Street casino corridor. 

NuWu Cannabis Marketplace: Las Vegas cannabis social lounge stretches over 16,000 square feet

The land on which the NuWu Cannabis Marketplace sits is sovereign territory owned by the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe. Covering almost 16,000 square feet, Nevada’s social cannabis lounge skirts around the state’s typical restrictions on cannabis consumption. Aside from being a place where consumers can unwind with a pre-roll, there’s even a 24-hour drive-thru window to purchase adult-use cannabis products!

Self-regulated by the Las Vegas Paiute Cannabis Authority, this local business is exempt from cannabis taxes. Furthermore, the NuWu Cannabis Marketplace does not require consumers to linger in waiting rooms before they can reap the benefits of their favorite plant.

“We decided to move the industry along and be pioneers,” says tribal council member and former chairman of the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe, Benny Tso. “It’s a safe and secure environment.”

Tso has lobbied hard for the establishment of Nevada’s legal weed industry. The tribal council member has worked closely alongside Tick Segerblom – a Democrat and Clark County Commissioner of District E.

“Experts administer the dab hit and bong rip; they know what the product is, what it does and how to let consumers consume safely. We’re looking at the safety and well-being of our customers, tribal members and our employees,” explained Tao. “People have asked before if we knew what we were doing because cannabis is such a provocative subject. Yes, we do know what we’re doing. We know the conditions of our tribe and its members, what they struggle with. This is why we’re doing that. We can [now afford] to look at things we weren’t able to before.”

NuWu Cannabis Marketplace : Las Vegas cannabis social cafe sells pre-rolls, concentrates and edibles

Embellished with plants, bistro lighting and wooden beams that invoke a sense of sophistication merged with relaxation, the NuWu Cannabis Marketplace has been likened to a brunch spot. However, what sets this Las Vegas cannabis marketplace apart is the fact that the menu features plenty to keep the seasoned cannabis consumer satisfied.

Bowls ($10-$12), concentrates ($12-$14), edibles ($8-$10), pre-rolled joints ($20) and pipes ($22-$25) can be ordered by guests. For customers who fancy swapping a night on the strip for a more relaxing experience – minus the hangover – the NuWu Cannabis Beer ($8) will go down nicely; this signature lager contains Pilsner malt.

All revenue earned by the NuWu Cannabis Marketplace will be funneled into various tribal services, including education, healthcare, government assistance and elderly care.

“This just gave the tribe three more generations. Economically for the tribe, it puts us in the position of becoming fully self-sufficient,” concludes Tso.