Study: UC researchers claim cannabis consumers have less chance of dying from a heart attack

“Perhaps the most striking finding of our study is that [cannabis] use prior to AMI was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality post AMI,” explained the researchers.

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Study: UC researchers claim cannabis consumers have less chance of dying from a heart attack

Bethan Rose Jenkins, Cannabis News Writer/Editorial

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Many myths and misconceptions surrounding the cannabis plant are gradually being debunked, thanks to an emerging patchwork of research and scientific evidence. For instance, there was the stoner stereotype myth, which was dispelled by researchers from the University of Colorado (UC). Let’s not forget about the old saying that weed makes you fat, either. Researchers from the Michigan State University debunked this myth earlier this year.

Now, the myth that cannabis causes heart attack has been replaced with solid evidence that it could actually improve an individual’s chances of surviving one. This conclusion was drawn up after a team of researchers from UC closely analyzed the medical records of millions of patients  What they discovered was that patients who were hospitalized following a heart attack had a greater chance of survival if they consumed cannabis.

“[We] would strongly suggest that [cannabis] use is associated with a significant decrease in in-hospital mortality,” wrote the researchers, who made a point of noting that ongoing research is necessary to fully determine the plant’s ability to prevent mortality in cardiovascular-related cases.

Approximately 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease every single day

The World Health Organization (WHO) claims that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S., killing 2,200 Americans on a daily basis in the U.S. That’s the equivalent of 40 cardiovascular-related deaths every 40 seconds. WHO predicts that 23.6 million people will lose their lives to heart disease and stroke by the year 2030.

More than one in three adults have heart disease, with a 2014 report revealing how 92.1 million American adults suffer from some form of cardiovascular disease. If that wasn’t shocking enough, heart disease kills more Americans than chronic lower respiratory disease and cancer combined.

A growing number of individuals who suffer from heart disease, many of whom will have endured a stroke, are seeking out medical cannabis as a treatment. Costing the healthcare industry hundreds of billions of dollars annually, cardiovascular disease is pulling money out of the taxpayer’s pockets.

Thankfully, if more studies like the one from CU’s researchers can expose the cannabis plant’s suitability as a treatment, patients may soon be benefiting from natural treatments. What’s more, local governments and states could enjoy an additional stream of revenue from medical cannabis patient programs that include cardiovascular disease as a qualifying condition.

Researchers discovered a decreased risk of death and shock among cannabis users

To conduct the study, researchers from the University of Colorado focused solely on data submitted to medical records for patients with Acute Myocardial Infarctions (AMI). AMI cases can be extremely diverse, with the medical term being applied for patients who have endured any kind of heart-related emergency.

Among the patients whose data were analyzed by the researchers, those who used weed were less likely to die or experience shock. Cannabis users also carried a lower risk of having a catheter inserted into an artery to promote circulation via the heart.

“Perhaps the most striking finding of our study is that [cannabis] use prior to AMI was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality post AMI,” explained the researchers. “Given the increasing prevalence and acceptance of [cannabis] use, these findings suggest that additional study is warranted to further investigate these discoveries and to identify potential mechanisms by which [cannabis] is associated with improved short-term outcomes following AMI, and for mitigating the possible negative effects of concomitant substance use.”

The researchers say that their findings are in keeping with previous studies that focused on the effects of cannabis consumption in patients with cardiovascular disease. However, they say that more research is needed to fully determine the link between cannabis use and in-hospital mortality post AMI.